He Loves Her More

Author: Erin, a survivor

Erin is a survivor of human sex trafficking. She was groomed and trafficked by a fake boyfriend in her teens. Thankfully, she escaped and is now married to a wonderful man.

This poem is a tribute to her husband, and how he loves her.


To the girl who’s triggered to sleep in a bed, too tired and weary to hold up her head.

Her angel casts down from the couch to the floor, the fear drifts away and he comforts her more.

Sleep should be peaceful, quiet and calm but to her it is nightmares and an evil realm.

But the floor brings the rock, the grounding, makes her in control of her surroundings.

Horrible things were done on those beds. The memories sink deep into the threads.

The mattress springs. The sheets suffocating texture.

She lays on the carpet instead and he just lets her.

She was forced to stay in the bed with a revolving line of men,
so now when it’s her choice she will never sleep again.

More than the comfort of the mattress he’s known his whole life, he chose to lay on the floor in the darkness with his wife, because he loves her more.

He could have chosen the fanciest bed, but he chose the floor instead.

After 10 years he still doesn’t complain of his backaches and pain.

From the bed to the floor for he loves her more.

Stories of Healing

Whereas statistical information and reporting are helpful with understanding the issues as solutions are sought, focusing merely on the numbers can make the victims nameless, simply a number, as it were.

Each and every victim of human trafficking has a name, a voice that has been silenced, as well as a life worth saving, and a story worth telling. This fact makes highlighting stories of rescue and healing vital.

In honor of Human Trafficking Awareness Month, here are three such stories.

Erin: healing moment

At a recent Human Trafficking Awareness Conference, the Q&A panel included social workers, law enforcement officers, lawyers, and Erin, a survivor of human trafficking.

When asked how the police had treated her, Erin froze, not wanting to tip the apple cart. Seeing Erin’s hesitation, Becky McDonald, founder & president of WAR, Int’l, encouraged her to speak up and share her experience.

Erin shared how the police were not helpful regarding her situation, telling her there wasn’t anything they could do for her. One officer even asked for her number.

Upon hearing the apologies from the male law enforcement officers on the panel, Erin had an unexpected response. Those apologies, she realized, healed a place in her heart she didn’t know needed healing.

Trauma-informed interviewing is key when assisting survivors. During our February 2022 Light Up Your World Zoom, we learned about this interviewing technique from Amy Allen, a federal law enforcement officer. Click here to view it.

Reena: finding solutions

How many girls had now disappeared from Reena’s village? She had watched as foreigners came, promising education or stable jobs to girls of impoverished families. Out of desperation, they had been sent or sold to provide for the rest of the family. But Reena knew these promises were empty.

Reena knew traffickers targeted poor and vulnerable families.

Yet she had a plan. Reena began a small bakery where she could employ at-risk women in her village, giving them the fair payment they needed to provide for their families.

To Reena’s delight, the bakery thrived! Now she’s running four sustainable micro-enterprises to sponsor a safehouse, counseling services, vocational training, micro-loans, and different classes!

Reena’s work is helping attack trafficking at its root cause and freeing hundreds of lives from its threat. Support WAR’s micro-enterprise program to be a ‘Reena’ to others at risk.

Rhoda: story of resilience

Ever since she was a little girl, Rhoda wanted to sing. After much local success, Rhoda thought she caught her big break when a talent agent promised a vocal tour in Japan. Though her first visit proved successful, on her second trip, traffickers took her papers and forced her to serve drinks at a bar. One night a co-worker lured Rhoda to a “dance club” filled with the Japanese mafia. After drugging and abducting her, mafia members repeatedly brutalized and raped Rhoda for three days.

She eventually escaped, but the Japanese police blamed her, and a counselor even advised suicide as the only way to preserve her dignity. Even after returning home to America, help was nowhere to be found.

Finally, Rhoda discovered a community of healing and support at WAR, Int’l. Now she no longer numbs her pain with substance abuse and self-mutilation. Instead, she has transformed her suffering into a story of survival and hope. Rhoda uses her passionate voice to share this story, singing at benefit concerts, speaking out against human trafficking, and whispering words of hope and encouragement to vulnerable teens and wounded women.


A Song for the Silenced

Resources for your here.

Effect Change – Giving Tuesday 2023

EMAIL: October 17, 2023

Dear Devoted WARriors,

Giving Tuesday 2023 is around the corner, and Women At Risk, International (WAR, Int’l) is excited to join this global movement of generosity. This year, we invite you to be a part of something truly special and link arms with us to effect change in the lives of those in need.

For Giving Tuesday 2023, WAR, Int’l has set a goal of $40,000 for our 911 Rescue Fund. We are excited to have an anonymous matching gift, which means your contributions will have a greater impact to effect change.

At this very moment at our Headquarters, we are involved in four such rescue efforts. We receive emergency calls weekly from all over the country as well as from our global connections.

With your support, the contributions to the 911 Rescue Fund will allow us to provide emergency funding for housing, legal aid, medical assistance, food, transportation, and more in urgent situations, at a moment’s notice. This Fund allows WAR, Int’l and its partners to rush to the aid of those in imminent danger. We rely on this fund when we get an emergency call from a distressed woman trying to escape her trafficker, when a desperate partner calls about a crisis situation, and when life-saving intervention is crucially needed. When circumstances call for immediate action, there is no time to ask for donations.

Join us for #GivingTuesday2023 and be a part of something greater. Together, we can effect change as we make a difference in the lives of others, in their time of need. Over the next few weeks, leading up to November 28th, we will be sharing powerful and important stories of rescue to help you grasp the scope of your WAR Int’l Giving Tuesday 2023 donation and its impact to effect change.

Together, we can make this Giving Tuesday unforgettable.

Read Real Rescues here.

Want to start effecting change today?

Give online here.
Send a check to: Women At Risk, International, 2790 44th St. SW, Wyoming, MI 49519.

If you write a check, please be sure to note on the memo line that it is for our Giving Tuesday campaign so your contribution can be counted toward our goal!

Want other ways to effect change?

Share our posts on social media: Facebook & Instagram.
Talk about Giving Tuesday with friends and family.
Ask your company if they have a corporate donation policy.

Real Rescues

Working to raise donations for Women At Risk, International’s 911 Rescue Fund, we want to share the impact your contributions make in the lives of others, in their time of need. Here are stories of Real Rescues.


The Genesis of WAR, Int’l’s 911 Rescue Fund: Ellie

Mai cut the cooked egg into four sections, dividing it equally between her four hungry children. With another one on the way, there would soon be five hungry mouths to feed.

Two weeks after her new little one was born, Mai sold Ellie, her beautiful baby girl, to local traffickers. When our partnering safehouse heard about the situation, they tracked Ellie down and loaned Mai money to buy her back, despite threats from the traffickers.

Now adopted into a safe home, Ellie is blossoming under the love and care she receives.

Our 911 Rescue Fund grew out of this partner’s request in the dead of night to rescue this precious baby girl who had been sold to Thai traffickers for $200. Becky McDonald, founder and president of WAR, Int’l, was shocked they had to ask for the funding to rescue. Becky promised the money blindly, saying she would have a garage sale if necessary, and begged them to rescue the baby without delay!

We want WAR, Int’l and its partners to be empowered to immediately intervene in a rescue—not wait for the funding needed to save a life.


This Week’s Rescue Story: Margaret

Too many times, the trafficker is someone the victim knows. For Margaret, this was her story. Margaret’s boyfriend forced her to sleep with other men in order for him to secure drugs.

A moment in time allowed her, along with her teenage daughter (who WAR, Int’l was advised had thankfully not been trafficked), to escape. Like many others, they simply left with the clothes on their backs. It was during this time, when they were hiding in a hotel, that WAR, Int’l received Margaret’s call and was able to provide assistance.

Because of funding in our 911 Rescue Fund, we were able to provide food, clothing, and other basic essentials. To be reunited with family in another city, we also assisted with transportation needs.

It is through the generosity of the WAR Family that WAR, Int’l is able to effect change for the lives of those in need, in their time of need. Together … we rescue. #EffectChange


This Week’s Rescue Story: Angel

The day COVID-19 hit the U.S. in 2020, Rebecca McDonald, founder & president of WAR, Int’l, hid a young woman in her car.

When you help a woman escape exploitation, you see the painfully high cost of freedom. While she leaves abuse behind, in many cases she’s also leaving everything she’s ever known. She may never see family again if they were the root problem. Starting over is exhausting, let alone while navigating trauma and healing as well. Freedom is not free but painfully expensive in a thousand different ways.

For hours, Angel had run barefoot from her traffickers before she got WAR, Int’l’s number from a national hotline. Thankfully, she called us and we were able to assist her. As Angel was running from her trafficker, Becky hid Angel in her car as we arranged safe housing.

Today, Angel is flourishing as a legal secretary; pro bono lawyers have cleared the crimes claimed against her; she has visitation with her kiddos again; and thanks to the WAR family, she was able to get a car. Her lawyers had told her she needed a car so the judge would take her seriously because her only mode of transportation at the time had been a bicycle.

Your WAR, Int’l GT ‘23 gift immediately empowers rescue and intervention.


This Week’s Rescue Story: Ramona

Overcoming unimaginable circumstances, Ramona found the strength to be a witness against her traffickers in court. There is great importance in shedding light on the realities of human trafficking and bringing perpetrators to justice.

Having received a call from a federal agency, WAR, Int’l was asked to take Ramona shopping for clothes she could wear to court. We went into overdrive to “outfit” this courageous survivor to be the key witness against a trafficking ring. We ignored the attention we attracted by shopping under armed guard, and instead, rejoiced as we watched Ramona’s countenance transform from fear to confidence!

She whispered, “Why do you care for me when you don’t even know me?”

We love that question! The 911 Rescue Fund allows us to immediately engage in the moment of danger and empowers us to love in the name of Christ. We applauded Ramona’s resilience and were honored to be a part of her story.

GT ‘23 is fast approaching, benefitting the 911 Rescue Fund that allows us to respond, inform, and reach into lives with action. A matching gift doubles its impact.

Please consider donating today as the need for our 911 Rescue Fund is very real.


This Week’s Rescue Story: Moses

At four months old, Moses was an adorable baby—but his family offered to sell him to anyone who wanted him. In this situation, he came to the notice of a group of our partners who took turns watching him. Fortunately for Moses, we found him before a trafficker did. While the law tied our hands, we were able to use money from the 911 Rescue Fund to pay for his immediate needs.

Consider donating today to start making an impact as your gift immediately empowers rescue and intervention.


Want to start effecting change today?

Give online here.

Send a check to: Women At Risk, International, 2790 44th St. SW, Wyoming, MI 49519.

If you write a check, please be sure to note on the memo line that it is for our Giving Tuesday campaign so your contribution can be counted toward our goal!

Want other ways to effect change?

1. Share our posts on social media: Facebook & Instagram.
2. Talk about Giving Tuesday with friends and family.
3. Ask your company if they have a corporate donation policy.

Reflections on my internship

Author: Emily, WAR, Int’l Intern


What initially brought me to WAR was my interest in the anti-trafficking and anti-sexual exploitation movement that started several years ago. I knew I wanted an internship before graduating college for work experience, and I wanted my internship to be at an organization working in the anti-trafficking area since I’m considering working in a non-profit after graduation.

My mom visited the WAR Chest Boutique last year and sent me some earrings and brochures, and that’s how I first heard about this specific organization. My initial interview was very encouraging, and when I was offered the internship that had a lot of flexibility for my personal schedule, I accepted.

I’ve learned many things from my time here!! One thing I really appreciated was having a much more in-depth understanding of how a small non-profit organization like WAR operates and is influential locally and internationally. The need for partnering with other non-profits and shelters/programs is something I’ve taken out of this internship. I’ve been impressed by the high business and ethical standards here.

I’ve also learned that there are many different jobs needed in a non-profit organization (and a lot of overlap between positions when it’s a smaller non-profit!). That’s encouraging to me, since my major is Sociology and not Social Work, and so I know I can’t be involved in the social work aspect of anti-trafficking organizations with just a Bachelors.

I’ve learned the extreme importance of cultural sensitivity in this field, both internationally–I remember Becky’s story about the University of Chicago(?) trying to get abused women divorces in a culture where that’s a bad idea–and locally, since shelters in the United States are modeled after international shelters and so aren’t as effective here because of our individualistic values.

One other thing I learned was how to make effective social media posts, specifically using language consistent with the organization and avoiding language that could mislead or overwhelm the audience. Since my minor is in Communications, I really appreciated getting this experience, and also being able to use my sociological appreciation of statistics as well.

My next steps after this internship will be to talk to my advisor about how I can perhaps utilize my specific Sociology degree in the anti-trafficking field. I want to find out if getting a Masters is enough to help me work in some research capacity in the future. But whether or not I end up working in an anti-trafficking/sexual exploitation organization, I want to remain involved by volunteering with local organizations, sharing on social media, and donating once I become financially stable post-graduation.

Although the things I’ve learned during my internship has been overwhelming at times, I still feel very and more passionate about this important issue, and I also feel more equipped to talk about it. Overall my internship has been a great experience, and I’ve really enjoyed and will miss working with my fellow interns and my supervisors here.

Call To Actions –

Apply for an internship here.
Learn more about WAR’s work here.
Resources for you here.